They Made This – Holly’s High Fives: Jamie Morgan

For my most recent They Made This column High Fives I chatted with the legendary Jamie Morgan. Each month, I ask photographers I love about their careers so far – via five questions and five images…

Here’s an extract, you can read the full article here.

“For her newest High Fives, photographer Holly Falconer had a chat with photographer and director Jamie Morgan, a legendary image maker who first made his mark as a founder member of the 80s creative collective Buffalo. During that time, he created incredible images with the late stylist Ray Petri, as well as writing Neneh Cherry’s Buffalo Stance, a tribute to the collective. He’s currently based in London, and continues to shake things up for a huge and diverse variety of clients and collaborators, which includes everyone from Balmain and Givenchy to Dr Martens and Sink the Pink.

Jamie Morgan : Binx. "I like the simplicity of it. No make-up, shot on film, in daylight, it is pure old school portrait photography, but at the same time very modern. Binx was the girl of the moment and she had that attitude that made her real, not just a model."

Jamie Morgan : Binx. “I like the simplicity of it. No make-up, shot on film, in daylight, it is pure old school portrait photography, but at the same time very modern. Binx was the girl of the moment and she had that attitude that made her real, not just a model.”

So much of Jamie Morgan’s work has become iconic and a go-to reference for young photographers and stylists. His insistence on putting personality first and consistently going against the grain when it comes to gender, race, age and convention has always marked him out. That, combined with the striking simplicity of his photography. He’s long been an inspiration to Holly, who was excited to have him on board for this latest instalment…

What initially inspired you to become a photographer?

I got a summer job at Magnum Photos Agency filing Henri Cartier-Bresson negatives and I totally fell in love with photography. I decided to go to college to study photography but left after one term, getting a job as an assistant. I instinctively knew that the best way for me was to jump straight in. I worked super hard, assisting 16 hours a day and testing the rest of the time. After 2 years I was starting to shoot for the Face magazine and it grew from there.

How do you think being a part of the Buffalo movement still influences your work now – do you think it’s important for young photographers to be part of a gang or collective when they start out?

It’s part of who I am. The intention behind it is always with me. Yet the images I took with Ray Petri are very different from the work he did with other members of Buffalo. Today I see what part of that was mine and you can see the same themes in the work I do today, my pictures carry a thread in Buffalo and beyond.
It is wonderful to have collaborators who you creatively trust. The whole process is a collaboration. So it’s good to have a crew, a team who you trust and are inspired by, however loose or intertwined the structure of those relations are.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *